04Feb
By: Neghar On: February 04, 2017 In: feminism, Fitness, heart wisdom, Mindfulness, Mindset Comments: 3

Fact: A woman’s primary purpose in life is not to have an “ideal” body. 

A woman’s primary purpose is likely not primary at all, but an amalgamation of the myriad things that make her unique and valuable—but her body, and how the world views and judges it, is not at the forefront.

Or at least, it shouldn’t be.

I know that given the media we consume and the societal pressures we endure, this fact seems hard to believe or embrace, but it’s true. We’ve gotten lost in the unattainable perfection of it all, stymied by diet culture and fitness magazines, and led astray from not only our inherent worthiness, but all the pursuits we can invest in that don’t involve our physical appearance.

We live in a culture where little boys are praised for their intellect and ingenuity, and little girls are praised for their beauty. We’ve been bred, from our inception, to be more preoccupied with our aesthetics than any other aspect of our otherwise multidimensional existence.

I think we, as a collective group, are coming to the understanding that we can love our bodies—to the acceptance that self-love is of the utmost importance. But, at the root of this body positive movement is something we aren’t always willing to discuss:

Why is my body so important in the first place?

Who is benefiting from sending me these messages? How can I stop receiving them and recreate my own narrative?

Caring for our bodies is extremely important. Fitness and nutrition are valuable pursuits that can improve our lives. In a similar vein, makeup and fashion are both fun and self-expressive. The point isn’t to lambast any and all aesthetic pursuits, rather to demonstrate that we are MORE than that, to remind us that we are powerful, talented, purposeful beings—and that purpose stems far beyond the external image we present.

I don’t know about you, but I’m sick of this. I’m done playing small, done devoting all of my resources-both tangible and energetic-to the pursuit of and obsession with fat loss. I’m done stressing out over my appearance and ignoring my myriad other talents and virtues. I’m done unsuccessfully living up to someone else’s arbitrary and unrealistic standards.

Won’t you join me?

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  • I think its all of it combined, there is so much said and shown around picture perfect bodies that women do feel that there is something missing with them. So media is somewhere responsible.

  • I see so many girls working to get into lower sizes, doing anything to be as small as possible. Many girls are so thin that in another country, we’d offer them support services. As a mom, I remained fit and lifted weights trying to grow, my family appreciates strength, over skinny.

  • My level of fitness or body definition doesn’t define me, I’ve experienced bias due to appearance. I desire to look and feel good about myself,fitness and health does that for me. My physical appearance is the result of my chosen lifestyle, I’m on the lean side. A similar fitness friend feels they are bodyshamed by appearing fit. Bodyshaming for fitness hasn’t been approached as an issue. Being called a skinny bitch isn’t always funny, neither is being avoided by those who feel your bodyshape indicates you judge others. More than one person has told me that they were surprised I was pleasant to speak with as they prejudged me as that skinny bitch.